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10 Resolutions to Commit to Better Sleep

When was the last time you got a good night's sleep? Processed foods, late night television,computer use and mineral deficiencies can all keep you from getting your zzz's... AND your health might be suffering as a result!

Sleep: Do You Get Enough?

When was the last time you had a full night's sleep? And how often do you wake up naturally, without an alarm? Or perhaps you've joined the millions of Americans who experience insomnia- you want to sleep, but you just can't!

Sleep deprivation is very common, and if you're like many Americans, you probably get less than 6 hours of sleep per night.1

But did you know that adequate sleep is vital for your health?

You need a good amount of sleep (somewhere between 7 and 9 hours per night) to:2

  • Improve memory and learning
  • Boost your metabolism
  • Help you maintain a healthy weight
  • Enhance your mood and wellbeing
  • Protect your cardiovascular health
  • Fight illness and disease

Sleeping isn't lazy. On the contrary, deep, restorative sleep is an easy way to improve your health. It's so simple, you can do it with your eyes closed!

As you make your New Year's resolutions, incorporate these new habits to help you commit to better sleep:

  1. Get your minerals.

    You need minerals to feed your adrenals, the small glands above your kidneys that help regulate your sleep cycle.

    If you have difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep at night, then your adrenals might be weakened. Your adrenals need lots of minerals from green, leafy vegetables, ocean vegetables and mineral supplements, like Ancient Earth Minerals.

    Read Sleeping Trouble? Discover Why Winter is the Ideal Time to Learn How to Sleep Right to learn more about how to nourish your adrenals for a good night's sleep.

  2. Exercise.

    OK, you know you should exercise, but did you know it can help you sleep?

    Research shows that even 30 minutes of exercise can help you get a good night's sleep. Make sure you break a sweat and keep exercising regularly for the best benefits.3

    If you're worried about evening exercise keeping you up, then time your workout about 5 or 6 hours before plan to go to bed.

    Learn more about how to get the most out of your workout with our 9 Resolutions to Commit to the Most Beneficial Exercising.

  3. Take naps.

    Short naps (20 to 30 minutes) are good for you!

    While you might associate naps with laziness, research shows naps improve alertness and performance, help you relax, and even reduce your blood pressure.5

  4. Detoxification TrainingIs your body starving from mineral deficiencies? With Ancient Earth Minerals, you get the highest quality, bio-available humic, fulvic, micro and macro minerals and amino acids in capsule form! Just 3 capsules in the morning and 3 capsules at bedtime will help you boost your minerals, detoxify your body and avoid the dangers of today’s low quality foods.Learn more about Ancient Earth Minerals and order yours today!
  5. Get to bed before 10 p.m.

    Even if you only do it a few times a week, hitting the sack before 10 p.m. gives your body crucial time for restoration and optimal hormone levels.

    Your body's level of melatonin, the hormone that induces sleep, peaks between midnight and 1 a.m. so it's ideal to be asleep by then. 6

    If you're really committed to healthy sleep and nourishing your adrenals, then make 9 p.m. your goal at least once per week.

  6. Avoid sugar.

    There are a lot of reasons to avoid sugar (read our 25 key reasons to learn more, but getting a good night's sleep is a big one.

    Sugar and processed foods deplete your body of the minerals it needs to encourage rest and may give you a "sugar high" that keeps you from sleeping at night.

    You can indulge your sweet-tooth safely and healthfully with Lakanto, our newest all-natural, no-calorie sweetener that does not feed candida! Or, try a probiotic liquid to end sugar and carb cravings.

  7. Turn off the TV and computer.

    About 2 hours before bedtime, be sure to turn off your television and computer. The screens give off light that fools your pineal gland into thinking it's daytime.

    Your pineal gland needs darkness to tell your body to produce melatonin, so it is essential that you turn the lights down before bedtime.

  8. Relax before bed.

    Now that you've turned the lights down, why not read a book, listen to relaxing music or take a warm bath?

    Relaxing activities help prepare your body for sleep and get your mind ready as well.

  9. Sleep in your bedroom.

    Reserve your bedroom for sleep. It may seem obvious, but many people have offices in their bedrooms or watch TV from the bed.

    If you have the space, move hobbies and work into other rooms and make your bedroom a sanctuary where you can rest and recharge.

  10. Take a sleep retreat.

    One of the best ways to nourish your adrenals is to take a long weekend to do nothing but sleep! Four days of getting to bed at 9 pm. and sleeping until you wake naturally can do wonders for your energy and reset your body's clock to a healthy sleep cycle.

  11. Change gradually.

    As with any new change, take it step-by-step. Try to get to bed just 15 minutes earlier for a few days. Once your body is used to its new bedtime, make bedtime earlier by another 15 minutes.

    Slowly but surely, you'll start to get the sleep you need to encourage optimal health.

New Year's resolutions can help you make new commitments to your health, and sleeping more is one of the easiest ways to feel great.

This year, don't feel guilty about staying in bed. Catching your zzz's will make you healthier and more productive in the long run!

Sources:

  1. The Importance of Sleep and Health, Health.Harvard.edu.
    http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/importance_of_sleep_and_health.htm
  2. The Importance of Sleep and Health
  3. Sobel, David, "Exercise Improves Sleep," Healthy.net.
    http://www.healthy.net/scr/article.asp?Id=424
  4. The Short Story on Napping, SleepFoundation.org.
    http://www.sleepfoundation.org/site/c.huIXKjM0IxF/b.2419153/k.8430/The_Short_Story_on_Napping.htm
  5. Harmon, Alison, "Napping for a Healthier Heart," TechnicianOnline.com, 14 Nov 2007. http://media.www.technicianonline.com/media/storage/paper848/news/2007/11/14/Features/Napping.For.A.Healthier.Heart-3099716.shtml
  6. The Secret Shortcuts of Healthy People, MarthaStewart.com
    http://www.marthastewart.com/article/secret-shortcuts-of-healthy-people?lnc=18a9cf380e1dd010VgnVCM1000005b09a00aRCRD&page=4&rsc=articlecontent_health

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  • pravin

    very very very nice artical.

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Information and statements regarding dietary supplements/products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Information on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is a result of years of practice and experience by the author. This information is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional or any information contained on or in any product label or packaging. Do not use the information on this website for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing medication or other treatment. Always speak with your physician or other healthcare professional before taking any medication or nutritional, herbal, or homeopathic supplement, or using any treatment for a health problem. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, contact your healthcare provider promptly. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking professional advice because of something you have read on this website.

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