By Donna Gates, as seen on:

A little confession: Sometimes I read past blogs that I have written. I can't help but blush.

You see, I often share very personal and otherwise very private meditations with you.

The meditations that I share are all meditations that I do myself. At home. And alone. I never dreamed that I would share this aspect of myself with anyone, let alone a big sea of unknown readers.

But when it comes to health—breath work, meditation, and visualization are all extremely useful tools. And they are undervalued in the healthcare community at large.

I see the human body as one integrated whole. Full of spirit and full of biomechanical wonders. But to many people out there, spirit and energy have no place in medicine.

For example, I sometimes talk about golden light. I encourage you to visualize your cells. I ask you to use your imagination and "inner eye." But what does golden light have to do with the immune system? Or leaky gut? Or PMS cramps?

For the skeptics out there, the research that I refer to may feel like a relief! When I claim that your thoughts influence your health, I back it up.

But what about the meditations?

Well, besides organs, muscle and bones — when I look at the body, I see something pretty different. I see a network of acupuncture meridians. I see chakras. I see color. I see movement. And all of this guides the body to state of health or a state of disease.

The dialogue that I find between physical medicine and energetic medicine fascinates and inspires me.

And, as it turns out, there is no better way to practice mindfulness than to explore the sensations of fascination, inspiration, and discovery.

Building bridges from one idea to another creates its own light.

In the spirit of confession, I am going to share with you another little secret that helps me to connect deeply with my daily activities.

I use my IMAGINATION. Often.

I often envision a beautiful healing light emanating from my food before I start eating.

I am not sure when I began this or where I picked it up — but the focus and concentration required to visualize light brings me into what Dr. Darren Weissman calls "present time consciousness" or PTC.

I find most people eat in such a hurry — and for so many years I did as well. When we are inhaling food without paying attention, we are not grateful for it or the nutrition it may provide, we are not relishing the taste of each bite, and we are not chewing slowly for optimal digestion.

When I take a moment to focus on my food before eating, I open the gap for a calmness to descend over my body — my breathing becomes relaxed and full and I step away mentally from the to-do list swirling around my head.

If you try this, you will find that visualizing may take some mental energy. You may feel tired after active visualization. But, like a muscle, it gets stronger the more you use it.

What about you — how do you feel a greater connection to the Uni-verse?

How do you keep that connection energized even when doing everyday tasks?

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